Arc welding is used in construction, farming, mining and at sea. Regardless of what you’re welding on, or where you are doing it, you need electrodes, known as welding rods, to complete the welding process. The welding process is achieved when electricity passes through the electrode in to the metal being welded, creating an electrical arc that reaches temperatures of 5,000° Celsius. The electrical arc melts the electrode together with the base metal completing the welding process. This is true of both the 6011 electrode and the 6013 electrode.

Uses
The 6013 electrode is often used in situations that involve irregular or short welds that require a change in position because it provides a very stable arc and a smooth finish. The 6011 electrode is often the better choice on painted, dirty or greasy surfaces when appearance is not as important and more penetration is needed.

Polarity
The 6011 and 6013 electrodes can be used on both alternating and direct currents. Alternating current is an electrical current that changes direction of flow, while direct current flows steadily in one direction. For this reason direct current is often used when more heat is needed on the material being welded, and alternating current is used when less heat is needed on the material being welded. The most common welding machines sold are alternating current only.

Tensile Strength
Tensile strength is the measurement of resistance a material has to longitudinal stress. It is the maximum amount of force a material can take without breaking. The tensile strength of a welding rod can be determined by the first two numbers in the electrode’s name. In this case that is 60, so the maximum tensile strength of the 6011 and 6013 electrode is 60,000 psi.

Penetration
Penetration is the distance below the surface that metal is fused together from the heat created from the electrical arc between the electrode and the base metal. The 6013 electrode is best used for light to medium penetration on a thin metal, or sheet metal. The 6011 electrode offers more penetration than the 6013 so you can weld a slightly thicker material.

NOACH Group Limited(noachgroup.com) could provide this kind of Stick Electrodes. of course, our other welding materials are competitive.
TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com

In Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), you won’t be using a stick electrode or a filler rod. Instead, everything you need to deposit a weld comes from a spool of metal wire. In this welding process, more popularly known as MIG, a tank of gas (typically CO2 or argon) provides the shielding while the wire melts into the base metal. Nowadays, it is the most common process for structural welding and product fabrication.
When a welder pulls the trigger on his MIG gun (shown below), a wirefeed machine advances the wire out through a brass nozzle. This allows for pinpoint accuracy and an unobstructed view of what’s happening inside the joint. Welding out of position is a lot easier than with SMAW. And since the spool holds about a mile’s worth of wire, you don’t have to stop and reload very often. (The term MIG, incidentally, stands for “metal inert gas”. However, since CO2 and O2 are reactive gases, it’s more accurate to say MAG – metal active gas – when these gases are used.)

At any rate, there are two consumeables in the GMAW process – the gas and the wire. Like stick electrodes, there’s a classification system for MIG wire managed by the American Welding Society. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers also has a code, but it’s nearly identical. The AWS code for solid steel wire is known as AWS A5.18. Here’s what the classification number for a common wire for mild steel, ER70S-6, indicates:

ER – Electric Rod

70 – This two or three-digit number represents the minimum tensile strength of the weld metal, measured in pounds per square inch (PSI) multiplied by 1,000.

S – Solid wire.

6 – This number (with sometimes a letter added) indicates chemical additives used in the wire which may effect the polarity setting on the machine.

The 6 in this case indicates more deoxidizers have been added to the wire, which is helpful when welding on dirty or rusty steel. The other general purpose carbon steel wire type is ER70S-3. This one doesn’t have the added chemicals, so is used primarily on new or clean steel.

The most commonly used aluminum MIG wires are ER5056, a soft wire with good ductility, and ER5356, which is harder and has a high tensile strength.

Stainless steel MIG wire includes designations like ER308, ER316 and ER308-L. The L stands for low carbon, which provides extra corrosion resistance.

Once a wire type is determined for your welding equipment, two additional pieces of information are needed in order to purchase this consumeable. The first is the wire diameter, which is usually given in thousands of an inch. The most common sizes for welding sheet metal are 0.35 and 0.45. The table below is commonly found in consumeable spec sheets and is worth copying for reference. It tells you how to set the controls on your equipment and which gas you need, depending on the welding process.

MIG wire can also be ordered in “TIG cut lengths”. As the name suggests, the three-foot strands are used in TIG welding. Diameter sizes in this case are not given in decimals but rather as normal TIG rod sizes, such 1/16 or 3/32. See this example for details.

Flux-Cored Wire

Using “cored” wire allows a MIG welder to skip the tank of CO2 or argon and weld without the gas. That’s because the wire core contains ingredients that do the job of shielding the weld pool. This is particularly helpful when welding out of doors, since a stiff breeze is enough to disperse a compressed gas. The process is formally known as Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW).

Like stick rod coatings, the core of a flux-cored wire provides the shielding gas. Flux-cored wire also enables a welder to use higher amperages and larger diameter wires than solid wire. The process is ued extensively in structural welding outdoors. The deposition rate increases, along with work productivity. While cored wire costs significantly more than solid MIG wire, the labor savings generally makes up for the additional expense — and then some.

Despite the shielding additives, flux-cored wire is skinny enough to shoot out of a MIG gun. And the slag that comes with those ingredients is a fraction of what appears in the SMAW process. Regular flux-cored wire is often referred to as Self-Shielded or Innershield, which is a brand name sold by Lincoln Electric. (Hence, when no gas tank is used, the process is formally known as FCAW-S.)

Mercifully, the AWS standard for carbon steel flux-cored wire (AWS A5.20) varies only slightly from the MIG solid wire code. Instead of ER, an E (for electrode) begins the number in the case of all flux-cored wire. And instead of an S for solid wire, you’ll see either a T for tubular, or C, indicating a “composite” wire. E70C-6 is an example of a general purpose flux-cored wire. However, where you see 70, there’s a difference from wire code. Only the first digit is used to indicate tensile strength, multiplied by 10,000 (instead of 1,000 in the case of a MIG). The second number indicates the welding position. A zero designation means the wire is only good for horizontal or flat welding.

One of the most frequently used flux-cored wires in building construction is Lincoln Electric’s Innershield 232, which conforms to AWS E71T-8. The digit 1 indicates the wire can be used in all positions. The 8 signifies low hydrogen, which calls to mind the common stick electrode E7018. NR-232 is popular because its chemical composition meets seismic requirements for earthquake zones like California. On the downside, the wire is more difficult to work with than wires that don’t have the same level of seismic toughness.

The chart below lists recommended parameters for NR-232 and is excerpted from Lincoln’s welding guide for Innershield wires. (“NR” said aloud sounds like “inner”, which makes it easy to remember.) The number .068 in the chart is the wire’s diameter. Notice the polarity is DCEN. The designation CTWD stands for “contact tip to work distance”, which affects the amount of current moving through the joint. The “deposit rate” helps the purchaser calculate how much wire will be needed for a project.
Using Shielding Gas and Flux-Cored Wire Together
When a compressed gas is involved, the welding process is known as either Gas-Shielded or Dual-Shielded Flux-Cored Welding, since both the flux ingredients and compressed gas produce the shield. The formal designation is FCAW-G.

Here’s a more complicated example of a flux-cored wire, E71T-1C JH8, which breaks down like this:

E – Electrode

7 – Tensile strength measured in pounds per square inch (PSI), multiplied by 10,000; in this case, 70,000 PSI. Note the difference with MIG, which uses two numbers multiplied by 1,000.

1 – All-position welding capability

T – Tubular wire

1 – This is a wire usability specification. The options range from 1 to 14). The 1 here indicates that the wire has a rutile slag system (which means the chemical additives are acidic). Rutile coatings provide good weldability (low spatter, good arc quality and weld puddle control), but the mechanical properties are not considered as robust as a basic slag system.

C – This letter indicates that the wire requires CO2 shielding gas. (M would indicate an argon/CO2 shielding gas blend. )

JH8 – This optional code designates the maximum amount of diffusible hydrogen the wire can contain. (Editor’s note: Not sure what the “J” means…) In this example, less than 8 ml of hydrogen is permissible for each 100 g of weld metal. The lower the number, the less hydrogen allowable in the wire, and therefore a lower chance for hydrogen-induced cracking in the final weldment.

For a more in depth explanation of what the classification E71T-1C JH8 represents, examine this Lincoln Electric product page. Be sure to click on the tabs for “mechanical properties” and “typical operating procedures”.

As you can see, the many variables involved in choosing the right wire will take awhile to learn. It’s a good idea to focus on the most common rod classifications at first. As an entry level welder, however, you’re likely to find yourself restocking supplies and replacing empty spools on MIG machines. So exercising due diligence in selecting and storing wire products can prevent costly mistakes when a welding operation begins.

TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com

In welding, consumables are those materials that are used up quickly and need to be replaced. And since scores of product lines exist, along with a variety of classification systems, ordering these items can be something of an adventure. In any case, several important variables will factor into your selection process:
• type of metal being welded
• type of object to be welded (pipe, sheet metal, etc.)
• size and shape of the groove or other opening
• code and structural requirements
• welding position (vertical, overhead, etc.)
• available diameters of the rod/wire/electrode
• location environment (extreme cold, underwater, etc.)
The American Welding Society (AWS), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and other industry associations have tried to simplify the welder’s job by standardizing consumables. The standards insure that you choose the right material to meet the welding code. While manufacturers produce their own proprietary brands and models, the products themselves can be cross-referenced to applicable industry classifications. For instance, a rod sold under the proprietary name “Pipemaster 60” will conform to the requirements of an “E-6010” classification (which will be explained in a moment). For more examples, check out this sales list posted by Hobart Brothers .
Due to the multitude of choices out there, an experienced welder, technician or welding engineer maintains a binder or computer based system holding the latest inventories available from different manufacturers or suppliers. The binder should likewise include product spec sheets that describe in detail the properties of the material and compliance with AWS and ASME codes. This information is essential when it comes to identifying which product will work best for a particular assignment.

Entry-level welders should learn the standard classifications of common filler rods, wire and electrodes used by the companies they work for, and for the industry in general. You may be asked to fetch supplies from the storeroom or purchase some consumables from a local welding supplier. So understanding the vernacular is a must.

Use the Consumeables menu to the right or continue reading…

Stick Welding Electrodes
If you’re new to the profession, you might be a little confused about the difference between an electrode and a filler rod. In stick welding, the filler rod and the electrode are one and the same. Electricity supplied by a welding machine energizes the rod, which is attached to a metal clamp. (See photo below.) An electric arc is produced, generating intense heat. This melts the tip of the rod into the molten pool within the joint on the base metal.

Stick Electrode Classification

Stick electrodes are sold for the following metals:

• mild steel
• stainless steel
• low-alloy steel
• cast iron
• aluminum
AWS classifies stick electrodes according to several codes, depending on the metal type. One of the most common is AWS A5.1/A5.1M: Specification for Carbon Steel Electrodes for Shielded Metal Arc Welding. E-7018 and E-6010 are examples of rods used by pipe welders. Here’s what the numbers indicate:

E – Electrode

70 – Tensile strength of the weld metal, measured in Pounds per Square Inch (PSI). Note: some countries substitute a metric unit for PSI.

1 – This single digit number tells you the most difficult welding position you can use the electrode in (1 = any position 2 = horizontal and flat; 3 = flat only; 4 = overhead, horizontal, vertical down and flat)

8 – Since this last digit is sometimes combined with the third number to derive information about an electrode, it can cause some confusion. The goal here is to communicate the flux/deoxiders and other ingredients used in the electrode coating. Coatings are designed for both the polarity of the power source and the welding position. Thus, you have to read the two digits together to know what’s in the coating. The chart below gives you the recipe for all- position (1) and horizontal/flat (2) welding, along with the current types/polarties available for each rod designation.

TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com

SPECIFICATION COMPLIANCE: AISI/AWS A5.18 & ASME SFA 5.18 ER 70S-6
DESCRIPTION: ER70S-6 is a premium mild steel solid wire formulated to provide high quality welds and
trouble-free performance from heavy duty, high speed, spray transfer applications all the way to light duty low speed,
short-arc applications. ER70S-6 is designed for use with various gas mixtures such as 100% CO2 ,75/25 Ar/CO2 or
98/2 Ar/O2. Even in the most difficult applications ER70S-6 produces a smooth stable arc with low spatter,
producing a weld bead that ties in evenly with the sides and has a smooth finished appearance.
APPLICATIONS: Frame fabrication, automotive structures, farm implements, construction equipment, pressure
vessels, pipe fabrication, railcar construction and repair, general fabrication. Widely used in high-speed robotic and
automatic welding applications and semi-automatic applications.
NOMINAL COMPOSITION:
Carbon .06-.15 % Copper .50 % max. Manganese 1.40-1.85 %
Silicon .80-1.15% Sulfur .035 % max. Phosphorus .025 % max.
Nickel 0.15 % max. Chromium 0.15 % max. Vanadium 0.03% max.
Molybdenum 0.15 % max. Iron Balance Others Total .50 % max.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:
Density lbs/cu in .283
TYPICAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AS WELDED (GMAW)
Shielding Gas CO2 75%Ar/25%CO2 98%Ar/2%O2
Tensile Strength(psi) 80-85,000 85-90,000 85-90,000
Yield Strength(psi) 65-70,000 70-75,000 70-75,000
Elongation % in 2” 28.5% 28% 28%
Reduction of area 55-70% 55-70% 55-70%
Charpy V-notch ft. lbs. 20-30 25-35 30-40
* RECOMMENDED WELDING PARAMETERS:
GMAW(MIG) Parameters (DC Reverse Polarity) Electrode Positive Spray transfer:
Wire Dia. Amps Volts Argon/ 1-5% O2 Wire Feed ipm
.023 85-170 23-27 25 360-620
.030 135-230 24-28 25 390-670
.035 165-300 24-28 30 360-520
.045 200-375 24-30 30-35 210-390
1/16 275-500 24-32 40 150-360
3/32 300-600 24-33 50 75-125

TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com

Welding cable is designed for use in electric arc-welding machines to power an electrode, a specially designed metal rod, that conducts a charge. The charge carried by the electrode is needed to produce an electric arc, the heat source, between the electrode and the metals being welded.

Welding cable is made to be extremely durable and flexible. Arc-welding requires a person to move the electrode around the shop and along the joints being welded, so it is essential to have a flexible welding cable that allows for ease of movement. A high strand count and rubber insulation help increase the cable’s flexibility.

A durable cable is important in industrial environments where abrasions, cuts, burns from sparks, and oil and water exposure can quickly wear out a weaker cable.

Welding Cable is highly flexible stranded No. 30 bare copper conductor insulated with high grade black EPDM. A paper separator is utilized to enhance stripability. Maximum conductor operating temperature is 105°C in circuits not exceeding 600 volts. Minimum temperature rating -50°C. View our guide below to learn more about welding cable sizing and applications. Our full product line is also available below.
Sizing & Applications
This guide is meant to inform and support you in the proper selection and use of welding cable. We always recommend that you consult a licensed and competent electrician to help you with the sizing and selection of parts for your particular application.

Sizing
For welding applications, specifications to consider are:

Ampacity: The ampacity refers to the maximum amount of current your cable can handle safely. For more information, view the section on welding cable ampacity.

Length: Your cable should be long enough to reach every corner of the space you will be welding in. You will need to keep in mind (1) one cable connects from the welder to the elctrode and (2) another cable will connect from the welder to the piece that is being welded (also known as the work clamp or ground lead).

Gauge: The longer and thinner the welding cable, the lower the ampacity, so if you require a long cable, you may want to look at thicker sizes to compensate for the length and to prevent damage to your machine.
Applications
Arc-welding: For welding applications, two cables are required: one connects the machine to the electrode, while the other connects the machine to the workpiece that is being welded, and these two cables form a complete circuit.

Other uses: Welding cables are durable and flexible and are a popular choice for entertainment or stage lighting cables, lighting and sound systems, and communication vans. They can also function as battery cables for cars, inventer cables, and as a more cost-effective alternative to pendant (or reeling) cable on hoists and cranes.

This Portable Welder Instructable Tutorial is a great example of how you could use NOACH welding cable for your own personal projects. This particular project uses 50 feet of 1/0 welding cable to create a connection cable from the batteries/vehicle to the welder.
What affects welding cable ampacity?
Electrical resistance (in ohms) & insulation temperature rating: The more amps you run through your cable, the hotter it gets. The higher the resistance rating of the welding cable, the fewer amps you can safely run without overheating it. Overloading your welding cable will over heat it, which leads to damage to the insulation.

Cable size & length: Ampacity ratings decrease as the cable is longer and thinner.

Ambient temperature: Electrical resistance increases at higher temperatures. Ambient temperature affects the cable’s ability to dissipate heat. Multiple cables lying too close or on top of each other dissipate less heat.

TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com

The first principal when choosing a welding wire – also known as the filler metal is that the metal should be the same as the base metal to be welded.

Welding mild steel (also known as low carbon steel) you will need mild steel wire.

Selecting to MIG weld mild steel with solid wire and gas instead of flux core is done when you want a nice looking weld and the finish is important to you.

MIG welding is an inside process unless you have a special set up to prevent wind getting to your weld and blowing your shielding gas away outdoors. And where you have clean metal or metal that can be adequately cleaned for a good weld.

What is Mild Steel?
Mild steel or Low Carbon steel is a very common metal that is cheap and easy to form. It has properties that make it amenable to a wide variety of applications.

Mild Steel contains 0.05% to 0.025% Carbon – a low amount of Carbon.

MIG Welding Wire of Choice The ER70S-6 Standard
ER70S-6 is a good all purpose MIG welding wire for use with low carbon and mild steel. The ER70S-6 MIG wire has extra flux content, which includes levels of Silicon and Manganese.

The Silicon and Manganese acts as deoxidizers allowing you to weld metal that isn’t quite clean. Light dirt or rust are better tolerated by this wire and are eaten up by the arc or are trapped and appear as ‘Islands of Silicon’.
The production of islands of silicon on the welded surface can then be easily removed and must be chipped off by your chipping hammer if they are not to cause the flaking off of any subsequent painting.

Be sure to wear safety glasses as you chip at these shards of Silicon. They have a nasty habit of finding a new home in your eye causing an unexpected trip to the emergency room.

In addition ER70S-6 wire is often thinly plated with copper to help prevent the rusting of the wire before the wire gets to you and to aid in electrical conductivity as you weld.

With the right settings ER70S-6 should give you a nice clean weld, needing little slag clean off and a weld that is ready to paint.

TIG Wires
Submerged Arc Wires
Submerged Arc Flux
TIG Stainless steel wire
MIG Stainless steel wire
Stainless steel flux cored wire
Thorium Tungsten Electrode
Cerium Tungsten Electrode
Lanthanum Tungsten Electrode
Zirconium Tungsten Electrode
Yttrium Tungsten Electrode
Compound Tungsten Electrode
Pure Tungsten Electrode

If you have any demands, please feel free to let us know.
info@noachgroup.com